Golf ball hitting steel at 150mph

No one has a swing speed of 150 mph, including Tiger Woods who is just under 130 mph. I had no idea the golf ball compresses this much.

But first a little history I recently learned:

1- The Pro V-1 golf ball by Titleist is actually a three part ball, but you have to have a club head speed of at least 100 mph or more to be able to compress all three stages…If you don’t the ball never fully compresses and you don’t get the distance out of it that the pro’s do.

2- We will get more distance out of a ball that only has two stages of compression…Like the Titleist NG Tour. It is more suited to our swing speed and we can compress it upon impact and can hit it further than the Pro V-1 ball.

3- So the secret is not to buy the most expensive balls out there because we are actually decreasing the distance we can hit the ball, unless your club head speed is over 100 mph, which unless you are 21 to 50 years old, isn’t going to happen!!!

Watch this video, this shows what a golf ball goes through when hit at 150 mph…it’s amazing to me how long these balls last. Maybe that’s why the Pro’s use new balls ever time they play….

Thanks Gene

I’m skeptical of this one.  I don’t think a golf ball can do that.  Can it?

What’s on the last roll of Kodachrome film?

 KodachromeWhat should a photographer shoot when he is entrusted with the very last roll of Kodachrome?

Steve McCurry took aim at the Brooklyn Bridge, Grand Central Terminal and a few human icons, too. Paul Simon, the crooner synonymous with the fabled film’s richly saturated colors, shied away. But Robert De Niro stood in for the world of filmmaking.

Kodachrome enjoyed its mass-market heyday in the 1960s and ’70s before being eclipsed by video and easy-to-process color negative films, the kind that prints are made from. It garnered its share of spectacular images, none more iconic than Abraham Zapruder’s reel of President John Kennedy’s assassination in 1963.

But Mama Time is taking Kodachrome away, and McCurry feels the tug of nostalgia even as he loads Eastman Kodak Co.’s last manufactured roll into his Nikon F6, just as he’s done “so many tens of thousands of times.”

McCurry requested the final 36-exposure strip. After nine months of planning, he embarked in June on a six-week odyssey. Trailing him was a TV crew from National Geographic Channel, which plans to broadcast a one-hour documentary early next year.

The rest of the story

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