He and his Fitbit are ready for retirement

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12 thoughts on “He and his Fitbit are ready for retirement”

  1. in 2017 I was doing ‘trail magic’ at a trailhead on the AT and met an 82 year old man (Dale Sanders – trail name “Greybeard”) that was thru-hiking the AT. He briefly held the record until an 83 year old man named “M. J. Eberhart” (trail name “Nimblewill Nomad”) broke it in 2021.

    I also met “Pappy” (Victor Kubilis) in 2018; he was 87 years old and attempting to complete the AT for his third time; He held the record as the oldest to complete the Triple Crown (thru hiking the “big three” trails – AT, PCT and CDT) back when he was 71 and was attempting the AT again. I ran into him at a trail crossing in the pouring rain (at Tray Gap in Georgia) and he hung out for a few hours (under my popup tent) with about 6 other hikers. it was a very rainy afternoon. – I hear he got to Virginia; then took a shuttle up to Katahdin Maine and headed south but ended up calling it off somewhere in New Hampshire or Vermont.

    https://www.wabi.tv/content/news/Veteran-attempting-to-become-oldest-person-to-hike-Appalachian-Trail-490197711.html

    Mary Davidson was 77 years old when she completed the triple crown; She is the current record holder for that.

    https://www.outsideonline.com/outdoor-adventure/hiking-and-backpacking/mary-davidson-thru-hiking/

    Reply
      • basically it is a support network helping thru hikers; it takes many forms but usually I setup a station at one of the crossings where hikers can get drinks/snacks and supplies so they don’t have to run to a town for really basic stuff. we sometimes arrange local shuttle services and give them info on local options if they are heading into town.

        i try to keep plenty of clean water, ice, and a big kettle of water boiling so they can make coffee/tea or a steaming cup of oatmeal. – I also keep a trash can so they can get rid of any trash they are carrying; basic first aid; tools and a repair kit for mending broken gear etc.

        Reply
        • I also have some detailed maps of the area where I’ve highlighted points of interest along the next section of the trail (in both directions) and maps of the nearby cities where I’ve marked up places that are often of interest to hikers. (places for gear, restaurants, hotels, taxis, other nearby hiking destinations etc.)

          We also have plenty of people that are day hikers come by and they are often looking for other options in the area too.

          I do this mostly in February/March and early April every year because my spot is in Georgia and that is the peak time for thru-hikers starting their northbound hikes.

          Reply
          • That’s awesome.. I assume people pay for the supplies – or is anything donated that you give out? What happens if someone claims they lost their money along the way??

            Reply
            • I give that stuff out for free. – some people donate but that is not required/expected or asked for.

              It is kinda implied that the freebies are for thru-hikers but if a day hiker wants something it’s no big deal.

              I have seen some people show up with huge grills and sell burgers/hot dogs etc right by the trailhead but i’ve also seen groups (like boy scout troops) do the same for free. One time I saw a group show up with nurses and spa techs to do ‘foot care’; giving foot massages; manicures and helping people with blisters – they even had different types of insoles on hand to do custom fitting for anyone that was having issues with the fit of their shoes. – (that was at Woody Gap which is the first ‘major’ road crossing on the AT heading north – after most people have hiked a few days (and ~28 miles) to get to that point. I think they were sponsored but the services were all free for the hikers.

              Reply
            • Another common form of trail magic comes from the people that maintain the trails; clean and repair the shelter sites etc. Those are all volunteers too. (at least outside the borders of state/national parks)

              Reply
                • I also get to hear their stories; introduce people to other hiking and kayaking options in the area and hear about hiking trips in other parts of the world that I have yet to visit; I meet some pretty interesting characters and it motivates me to hit the trail more often (which I really need).
                  well worth the time and expense.

                  Reply

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